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    Backyard Entheogens — Psychedelics

    Backyard Entheogens: Absinthe

    Backyard Entheogens: Absinthe

    The Green Fairy takes flight
     

    The Green Fairy, aka la Fée Verte, lives in the absinthe, an alcoholic botanical blend of wormwood, anise and fennel. Highly ceremonial in its consumption, absinthe is legendary among poets, artists, and psychonauts for its hallucinogenic properties, and is deserving of the utmost regard, as the mythical Green Lady can turn nasty if consumed in excess.

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    Backyard Entheogens: Kinnikinnick

    Backyard Entheogens: Kinnikinnick

    Native American Smoking Blends
     

    Kinnikinnick, Native American smoking blends, were used for shamanic purposes, medicinal reasons, social rites, and for pleasure. Made from Indian tobacco (Lobelia inflata) and a number of entheogenic add-ons like Sassafras, Bearberry, Indian poke and Bog Bilberry, these psychoactive concoctions could be wildly euphoric.

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    Backyard Entheogens: Mexican Prickly Poppy

    Backyard Entheogens: Mexican Prickly Poppy

    Sacred plant of the Mexican rain god
     

    The Mexican Prickly Poppy has long been associated with the ancient Aztec god Tlaloc, whose worshippers ingested a psychoactive preparation of the seeds to enter the dream realm. Today, the plant has found use as a cannabis substitute and enjoyed for its euphoric and aphrodisiac effects.

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    Backyard Entheogens: Mescaline

    Backyard Entheogens: Mescaline

    Travel great distances in your sleep
     

    Native tribes have used peyote for thousands of years, and the shamanic ritual has spread to intrepid juggernauts seeking the visionary wisdom of the land. But did you know that more than 150 other species of cacti contain mescaline or similar shamanic compounds? Get ready to travel great distances with this backyard entheogen.

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