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    Heads Eats

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Cannabis roasted beets and Cara Cara oranges with fried garden herbs

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Cannabis roasted beets and Cara Cara oranges with fried garden herbs

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG Recipes Intro

     

    Cannabis roasted beets and Cara Cara oranges with fried garden herbs

    By Chef Sebastian Carosi

     

    Thirty-five years into the farm-to-fork movement and every professional chef and home cook alike has a version of roasted beet salad. The candy striped Chioggia beet is named after the coastal town in the Veneto region. My family descends from Northern Italy, and I get a thorough kick in the pants knowing that there is a small town there named Chioggia. Those of you that love heirloom vegetables, and beets in particular, will recognize the name. With its distinctive red and white stripes, Chioggia is the beet no one knows how to pronounce. Say it with me:  kee-oh-jee-uh.

     

    As beets are in my DNA, I have grown to like them in all preparations, but roasting is my all-time favourite, especially when the beets get a little bigger but are still very earthy and sweet. These cannabis-roasted beets are no different—super sweet, herbaceous, earthy and palette pleasing. For this recipe, I use heirloom Bull's Blood beets because they meld beautifully with the piquant cannabis while slow roasting. Bull's Blood beets are an older cultivar known for their natural sweetness, remarkably earthy flavour and high nutritional value. Red beets are betalains-rich offering a wide range of potential health benefits from countering inflammation and protecting the liver to anticancer and antioxidant activity. And let's not forget those gorgeous deep red leaves that are just as delicious and nutritious as the underground root. This old-school variety’s name hints to its mid-nineteenth-century origins when beets were known as blood turnips. 

     

    A salad made with such a rare and storied beet demands more than just your average orange. Loaded with lycopene and complex flavours, the Cara Cara orange was discovered at the Hacienda Caracara in Valencia, Venezuela in 1976. This super sweet, slightly tangy, low acid citrus is the perfect match for the earthy Bull’s Blood beet. Add crispy fried garden herbs, lemonade vinaigrette and wild fennel pollen and the lowly blood turnip is elevated to a crimson triumph. The wild fennel pollen, foraged along the Columbia River, is terpene-rich, loaded with limonene and alpha pinene—all the more reason to add this great salad to your roughage repertoire. It’s also wonderful inspiration to get outside and forage or garden for the ingredients you use in your culinary adventures. 

     

    Heads Lifestyle: Roasted Beets

     

     

    Cannabis roasted beets and Cara Cara oranges with fried garden herbs 

     

    Prep time: 15 minutes

    Roasting time: 1 hour

    Yield: 4 individual salads or 1 family style salad

    Total THC/CBD: depends on the potency of the products used

    Status: salad

    From the cannabis pantry: cannabis flower, cannabis-infused grape seed or olive oil, cannabis-infused rice wine vinegar

     

    Equipment 

    Small baking dish, chef's knife, cutting board, whisk, 2 small stainless steel mixing bowls, medium stainless steel mixing bowl, small sauté pan, large spoon, rasp, serving plates or platter

     

    Ingredients

    4-6 whole heirloom beets (the size of a baseball), scrubbed

    1/2 oz quality cannabis flower

    1/4 cup cannabis-infused grape seed or olive oil (made in the MB2e)

    3 Cara Cara oranges (peeled, cut into segments)

    1/4 cup very young wild chickweed or microgreens 

    1/4 tsp wild fennel pollen

    1 tsp fresh cracked pepper 

    2 tsp Jacobsen Salt Co. sea salt flakes 

     

    Preparation

    Preheat oven to 400°. Drizzle beets and cannabis flower with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Wrap in foil packets ensuring they are sealed up nicely. Place the bundles on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for about an hour. Let beets cool, then rub off skins with paper towels. (Dry and keep the purple buds for another application.) Slice the beets into large thin rounds and arrange in a large casserole. Drizzle the slices with a couple tablespoons of the vinaigrette and let marinate for 15 to 20 minutes before serving.

     

     

    Lemonade vinaigrette

    3 tbsp cannabis-infused grape seed or olive oil (made in the MB2e)

    1 tbsp fresh squeezed orange juice

    2 tbsp fresh squeezed lemon juice 

    1 tbsp cannabis rice wine vinegar (made in the MB2e) 

    2 tbsp wildflower honey

    pinch salt and pepper

     

    Preparation

    In a small stainless steel mixing bowl, combine oil, orange juice, lemon juice, cannabis rice wine vinegar, honey, salt and pepper. Whisk until well combined. Refrigerate until ready to use.



    Horseradish crème

    1/4 cup sour cream 

    1 tbsp fresh horseradish, grated  

     

    Preparation

    In a small stainless steel mixing bowl, combine sour cream and horseradish. Whisk until smooth. Refrigerate until ready to use.

     

    Fried garden herbs

    1 tbsp fresh rosemary leaves 

    1 tbsp fresh tiny sage leaves 

    1 tbsp fresh parsley leaves 

    1 tbsp fresh thyme leaves

    1 tbsp fresh cilantro leaves 

    15 thin slices of fresh jalapeño 

    1/4 cup vegetable oil

     

    Preparation

    Heat 1/4 cup oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. In batches, fry the herbs and jalapeño peppers until crispy. Drain on a paper towel and set aside until ready to use.

     

    To assemble

    Arrange the marinated beets on your desired serving plates or platter. Drizzle the remaining vinaigrette over the beets. Arrange the Cara Cara orange segments over the beets. Sprinkle with sea salt flakes and cracked pepper. Top with fried herbs and jalapeño rings. Drizzle or dot the beets with horseradish crème. Arrange a few leaves of wild chickweed on the beets. Dust with a pinch of wild fennel pollen. Serve.

     

     

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG

    To learn more about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his approach to cannabis cookery read our exclusive interview, Eat your damn greens! Chef Sebastain talks wildcrafting, cannabis cookery and his respect for the movement’s deep roots. Chef Sebastian generously shared this recipe with Heads Lifestyle. Now get in the kitchen and whip up something delicious! 

     

       

    Equipment + product source: MB2e MagicalButter Machine

     

    Photos: Chef Sebastian Carosi and Carla Asquith

    More about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his projects here

    Follow on Instagram at: @chef_sebatian_carosi

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Cream of forest foraged wild mushrooms

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Cream of forest foraged wild mushrooms

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG Recipes Intro

     

    Cream of forest foraged wild mushrooms

    By Chef Sebastian Carosi

     

    Foraging your way around the Pacific Northwest will lead to some incredible hot spots. Several factors determine a true hot spot: the variety and density of wild edibles available in a specific area or region. As a wild food-driven chef, I also factor in the importance of a sustainable harvest. I always ensure not to impede on the land or horde too many wild ingredients. 

     

    One of my favourite hot spots is Willapa Bay in Washington State. It seems as though everywhere you look there is food underfoot. Whether oceanside or bayside, the area gives up so many kinds of wild edibles including several varieties of seaweed, sea beans, goose tongue, oysters, razor clams, gooseneck barnacles, and many types of mushrooms. And yes, that includes the hallucinogenic kind. For many years, I’ve foraged king boletes, Pacific golden chanterelles, morels, saffron milk caps, and azzies—better known to the mycological world as Psilocybe azurescens. The azzie is the most psilocybin-dense mushroom on the planet. Most people never get the chance to forage for their own source of wild psilocybin therapy. I truly feel thankful to have been able to experience hunting wild azzies on the same stretch of dune grass for almost 30 years. 

     

    Living on the peninsula you quickly learn that the late fall months are the best time to forage wild mushrooms. Just be sure to bring your rain jacket. Since the area is such a microcosm of so many different environmental pockets, you get a lot of wild mushrooms popping up together at the same time. This means my dehydrator is going 24/7 and I usually put away three to four dozen jars of pickled mushrooms. I’m also eating mushroom dishes day in and day out. I am not complaining, just expressing my joy at the abundance of wild mushrooms right in my backyard. 

     

    Walking through the dunes along the Pacific Ocean, the trained forager will quickly identify the azzie. They are one of the only wild mushrooms that will grow in the dune grass before you hit the sandy beach. Easily recognized by their small brownish tops, the true test is the bluing on the stems shortly after being plucked from the sandy ground. In years past, I could easily pick several pounds in an afternoon, although with climate change the area is giving up less and less every year. 

     

    This simple cream of forest foraged wild mushroom soup is a true example of what people mean when they say that a certain dish has a true taste of place. Every time I make this soup, it quickly reminds me of where the evergreen forest meets the tumultuous Pacific Ocean and the wild azzies dance through the dune grass. I kept the dosage low for an adventurous and super mellow afternoon or evening. You can easily increase the dose to your liking.

     

    Heads Lifestyle: Forest Foraged wild mushrooms 

     

     

    Cream of forest foraged wild mushrooms

    Prep time: 25 minutes 

    Cook time: 45 minutes 

    Yield:  6 servings 

    Total THC/CBD:  depends on the potency of the products used 

    Status:  mellow mushroom soup

    From the cannabis pantry:  cannabis bacon fat, cannabis balsamic vinegar, cannabis butter 

    Chef’s strain recommendation: Trinidad OG 

     

     

    Equipment

    Chef’s knife, cutting board, high-speed blender or immersion blender, medium sauce pot, small sauté pan, tongs, ladle, bowls to serve the soup

     

     

    Ingredients

    2 tbsp cannabis-infused bacon fat 

    1 tbsp cannabis-infused creamery butter

    7 cloves garlic (peeled, crushed, and rough chopped)

    1 large, sweet onion (peeled and small diced)

    1½ lbs variety of wild mushrooms such as chanterelles, morels, or porcinis (rough chopped)

    ½ cup caramelized onions 

    ¼ cup all-purpose flour 

    ¼ tsp fresh rosemary (fine chopped)

    2 tsp fresh thyme leaves 

    ¼ cup dry mushroom mix (crush in your hands)

    ¼ gram dry psilocybin mushroom (preferably blue meanies or golden teachers)

    1 tbsp cannabis-infused balsamic vinegar 

    1 tbsp kosher salt 

    1 tsp fresh cracked black pepper

    6 cups mushrooms stock, chicken stock, or water 

    1½ cups heavy cream 

     

     

    Garnish

    2 cups thick sliced or torn wild mushrooms

    3 thyme sprigs, top leaves for garnish 

    2 tbsp cannabis-infused creamery butter

    kosher salt and cracked black pepper

     

     

    Preparation 

    In the saucepan over medium-low heat, add onions and garlic to the bacon fat and butter and sweat until the onions have just turned translucent. Next add the sliced mushroom mix, the rosemary and thyme, and sauté over medium heat for 8 to 10 minutes stirring occasionally. Add the flour to create a roux stirring well to combine. Then add the stock, dry mushroom mix, caramelized onions, salt and pepper, balsamic vinegar, and simmer over medium-low heat for 25 to 30 minutes stirring occasionally. (If the mixture looks like it needs a little extra liquid, add a small amount of additional stock.) Next add the psilocybin mushrooms and simmer an additional 10 minutes. In a high-speed blender or with a handheld immersion blender, puree the soup to your desired consistency. Return soup to empty pot and stir in heavy cream. Taste and adjust the seasonings with additional salt, pepper, balsamic and thyme if desired. 

     

    For the garnish, sauté the thick cut mushrooms of your choice in butter until butter is slightly brown and nutty. When done, add the fresh thyme leaves and stir to combine well. Remove from heat. Garnish each soup with several sautéed mushrooms, pan drippings and thyme sprigs. Serve soup hot.

     

     

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG

    To learn more about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his approach to cannabis cookery read our exclusive interview, Eat your damn greens! Chef Sebastain talks wildcrafting, cannabis cookery and his respect for the movement’s deep roots. Chef Sebastian generously shared this recipe with Heads Lifestyle. Now get in the kitchen and whip up something delicious! 

      

     

    Equipment + product source: MB2e MagicalButter Machine

     

    Photos: Chef Sebastian Carosi and Carla Asquith

    More about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his projects here

    Follow on Instagram at: @chef_sebatian_carosi

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Strawberry sativa bourbon smash

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Strawberry sativa bourbon smash

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG Recipes Intro

     

    Strawberry sativa bourbon smash

    By Chef Sebastian Carosi

     

    With Midsummer’s Eve upon us and strawberries taking a staring role at local farmers markets, a refreshing cocktail is perfect for those lazy crazy hazy days of summertime. That bottle of body-warming bourbon is probably still hanging around from your long winter hibernation. This simple smash combines some of the best seasonal ingredients the Pacific Northwest has to offer. It is packed full of vitamins and minerals with bright lemon and fruity berry terpenes and a little mellowing cannabis-infused bourbon. Expect this smash to quickly get played on repeat—over and over and sometimes over again. Enjoy, but drink responsibly especially if the alcohol used is cannabis-infused. 

     

     Heads Lifestyle: Strawberry Sativa Bourbon Smash

     

     

    Strawberry sativa bourbon smash 

     

    Prep time:  10 minutes 

    Yield:  1 drink 

    Total THC/CBD: depends on the potency of the products used

    Status: spring or summer smash, a cannabis cocktail 

    From the cannabis pantry: cannabis-infused bourbon 

    Chef’s strain recommendation: Strawberry Cough 

     

     

    Equipment

    Rocks glass, muddler, cocktail shaker, jigger, chef’s knife, cutting board  

     

     

    Ingredients 

    2 oz cannabis-infused bourbon* 

    1½ oz simple syrup 

    2-3 lugs of orange bitters 

    ¼ lemon 

    2 very ripe strawberries (hulled)

    crushed ice 

    1 strawberry (halved)

    2 fresh cannabis leaves 

     

     

    Preparation

    Combine the fresh lemon juice and whole strawberries in a cocktail shaker. Using the muddler, thoroughly mash the two ingredients until the juices combine. Add 1½ cups ice, bourbon, simple syrup, and bitters. Cover and shake vigorously until the shaker has frosted over. Pour contents into a chilled rocks glass. Garnish with half strawberry and fresh cannabis leaves. Enjoy!

     

    *Chef Sebastian uses the mb2e countertop botanical extractor by Magical Butter to infuse his bourbon 

     

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG

    To learn more about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his approach to cannabis cookery read our exclusive interview, Eat your damn greens! Chef Sebastain talks wildcrafting, cannabis cookery and his respect for the movement’s deep roots. Chef Sebastian generously shared this recipe with Heads Lifestyle. Now get in the kitchen and whip up something delicious! 

      

     

    Equipment + product source: MB2e MagicalButter Machine

     

    Photos: Chef Sebastian Carosi and Carla Asquith

    More about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his projects here

    Follow on Instagram at: @chef_sebatian_carosi

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Cannabis pickled magnolia blossoms

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Cannabis pickled magnolia blossoms

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG Recipes Intro

     

    Cannabis pickled magnolia blossoms

    By Chef Sebastian Carosi

     

    Steal magnolias… then pickle them!

    Helping to educate the dining public—and everyone out there that consumes food for that matter—about the abundance of unconventional food sources seems to fall on the shoulders of today’s creative chefs. As a wildcrafter and forager, discovering creative condiments using unconventional wild edibles and adding them to my repertoire is always great. Sharing them with you is truly what it is all about for me. While foraging is an innate part of human nature, it has been superseded by more convenient food sources. Yet there is plenty of interesting foods to forage that are growing within a short hike or walk from your home depending on where you live and what time of year it is. The beautiful magnolia is an ancient tree with relatives over 95 million years old. Its leaves, bark and blossoms are all edible and have been consumed for several thousands of years. The flowers enjoyed raw have a piquant spiciness, giving way to a creaminess that matches its intense floral nose, reminiscent of rose, ginger and cardamom. Having spent many of my formative culinary years in the American south—Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia—I quickly learned from some of the old timers what a scuppernong was, ate a paw paw, drank muscadine and how to pickle magnolia blossoms. The process was taught to me by an old Appalachia native, who invited me to his makeshift lunch table to try his souse. I didn’t know what the hell souse was. (For the uninitiated souse is head cheese in vinegar.) He broke me off a piece of clear souse with little bits of meat in it and placed it on a saltine cracker and topped the bite-sized snack with a bright pink pickled magnolia blossom. I’d never had Appalachian souse or a pickled magnolia blossom before that first culinary encounter. Fast forward almost 30 years and I love pickling magnolias and I love souse. I later learned that they pickle magnolia blossoms in England, but I will always associate them with Appalachia. Over the years I have adapted the recipe to fit a multitude of uses. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I do. And make sure you ask your neighbour before you steal their magnolias.

     

     Heads Lifestyle: Cannabis Pickled Magnolia Blossoms

     

     

    Cannabis pickled magnolia blossoms

     

    Prep time: 20 minutes

    Wait time: 15 minutes

    Yield: 2 to 3 pint jars

    Total THC/CBD: depends on the potency of the products used

    Status: condiment, use in place of pickled ginger as a garnish   

    From the cannabis pantry: cannabis rice wine vinegar, cannabis honey 

     

     

    Equipment

    Chef’s knife, cutting board, medium saucepan, large spoon, potato peeler, several mason jars and lids

     

     

    Ingredients

    1 lb. fresh magnolia petals or blossoms (stolen from your neighbourhood tree)

    1 cup rice wine vinegar 

    1 cup cannabis rice wine vinegar (made in the mb2e)

    5 dry hibiscus flowers

    ½ cup cannabis honey 

    1 cup sugar

    2 tbsp Jacobsen sea salt

    6-8 ounces fresh ginger strips (use a potato peeler)

    1 piece orange peel (zest) (use potato peeler)

     

     

    Preparation

    In a medium saucepan mix all the ingredients except the magnolia petals or blossoms. Bring the mixture to a boil, then add the petals and stir well. Simmer 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir well to separate the petals. Allow to cool at room temperature. Transfer to mason jars with lids and refrigerate. (You can also can or process the jars.)

     

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG

    To learn more about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his approach to cannabis cookery read our exclusive interview, Eat your damn greens! Chef Sebastain talks wildcrafting, cannabis cookery and his respect for the movement’s deep roots. Chef Sebastian generously shared this recipe with Heads Lifestyle. Now get in the kitchen and whip up something delicious! 

      

     

    Equipment + product source: MB2e MagicalButter Machine

     

    Photos: Chef Sebastian Carosi and Carla Asquith

    More about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his projects here

    Follow on Instagram at: @chef_sebatian_carosi

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Vietnamese sour tsunami fresh rolls

    Eat your damn greens recipe: Vietnamese sour tsunami fresh rolls

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG Recipes Intro

     

    Vietnamese sour tsunami fresh rolls

    By Chef Sebastian Carosi

     

    This must be one of my all-time favourite Asian-influenced dishes. You can rely on these rolls for a flavour-packed summer lunch or even a light dinner outside on a warm evening. With roots in Vietnam, fresh rolls are also known as summer rolls, nem cuon, goi cuon, Vietnamese rolls, nama harumaki, salad rolls, cold rolls, rice paper rolls, and spring rolls. I prefer calling them by what season it was when you gathered most of the ingredients used to make the rolls. 

    I enjoy heaps of fresh mint, Thai basil, cilantro, and shaved vegetables like young carrot, cucumber and even daikon radish. With a handful of precooked light rice vermicelli noodles, crisp lettuce and fresh cannabis leaves wrapped tightly in a soft rice paper wrapper—a luscious vegetable blanket—these rolls are extremely healthy and light. Ready for a quick dunk into a spicy tang tang or peanut sauce, they are truly refreshing in the heat of the late spring or early summer sun. 

    These dank green vegetable rolls are easily distinguished from other rolls by the fact that they are not fried. Quality is always important to keep in mind, especially if you are going to be eating raw cannabis. I tend to choose the younger tender shoots or leaves that have not been sprayed or treated with any chemicals. An abundant boost of raw vegetable protein, THCa, and CBDa is readily available in the raw cannabis and hemp leaves. The pair of dipping sauces is made utilizing full-spectrum cannabis-infused soy sauce and rice wine vinegar. I feel both sauces are completely vital to serve alongside these fresh rolls. One is savoury, sweet, and fatty. The other dank, dark, and salty. With several prerequisites filled—healthy, light, and slightly cannabis-infused—I am ready to dig in! 

    When you decide to make these vibrant snacks at home, be sure to have all your ingredients and things in place and ready to go. The process of making the rolls is easy, and they disappear off the plate just as fast as you can roll them. Kinda like your old college buddies and rolled joints. Enjoy!

     

    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG Recipes 1

     

     

    Vietnamese sour tsunami fresh rolls with peanut sauce and sweet + spicy tang tang sauce 

     

    Prep time: 45 minutes 

    Yield: 8 fresh rolls (serves 2-4)

    Total THC/CBD: depends on the potency of the products used 

    Status: stoner snack or super healthy lunch 

    From the cannabis pantry: fresh young cannabis leaves, cannabis-infused rice wine vinegar, cannabis-infused soy sauce 

     

    Equipment

    Chef’s knife, cutting board, mandolin, 2 medium saucepans, tongs, 2 medium stainless-steel mixing bowls, large spoon or fork, small whisk, rasp 

     

    Ingredients

    8 8½-inch round rice paper wrappers

    2 oz cooked rice vermicelli noodles 

    12-15 fresh Thai basil leaves

    24 fresh cilantro sprigs 

    12-15 fresh mint leaves

    8-12 small hearts of romaine leaves 

    16-24 fresh young cannabis leaves 

    16 5-inch long cucumber slices (peeled and seeded)

    ½ cup shredded carrot (on mandolin)

    ½ cup shredded daikon radish (on mandolin)

    4 5-inch long pieces of fresh green onion or scallion

    12 cooked shrimp or tofu, optional (cut shrimp in half and tofu in long pieces to fit in spring roll) 



    Preparation

    For noodles: Bring a saucepan of water to boil, add noodles, boil for 3-5 minutes or until done. Drain and rinse with cold water. Set aside. 

    For wrappers: Fill a large bowl or container with warm water. Dip wrappers in warm water to soften. 

    To assemble rolls: With wrapper flat, across the centre, lay 3 shrimp halves (if using shrimp), a handful of noodles, several basil, mint and cilantro leaves, cucumbers, carrots, daikon, hemp leaves, romaine hearts and green onions leaving 2 inches uncovered on each end. Next, fold uncovered sides inward, then tightly roll the wrapper, beginning at the end closest to you. Repeat this process until you are finished with 8 rolls. Serve rolls immediately with your choice of dipping sauces. Rolls can be cut to share. You can cover the premade rolls with a damp towel in the refrigerator for up to two hours but they should be eaten as soon as possible.

     

     

    Peanut sauce 

    Ingredients

    1 cup chunky organic peanut butter

    2 cloves fresh garlic (crushed and pulverized smooth)

    2 tsp fresh ginger rasped (or grated)

    2 tbsp cannabis soy sauce (made in the mb2e)

    1 tbsp cannabis rice wine vinegar (made in the mb2e)

    1 tbsp brown sugar

    2 tbsp lime juice

    1 tbsp chilli sauce 

    ¼ to ½ cup warm water (more if you prefer a thinner sauce)

     

    Preparation

    In a stainless-steel bowl with a fork or a spoon, mix all the ingredients until incorporated well. If sauce is too thick for your liking, thin with more warm water. Set aside. 

     

     

    Sweet + spicy tang tang sauce 

    Ingredients

    2 tbsp fish sauce 

    2 tbsp cannabis soy (made in the mb2e)

    ¼ cup cannabis rice wine vinegar (made in the mb2e)

    ¼ cup river water (pond water will do if clean)

    2 tbsp fresh squeezed lime juice

    2 cloves garlic (finely minced)

    ¼ cup sugar 

    2 tbsp chilli sauce 

    1 tsp finely sliced fresh chilli rings 

     

    Preparation

    In a stainless-steel bowl with a whisk mix all the ingredients well. Refrigerate prior to use. 



    Heads Lifestyle: EYDG

    To learn more about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his approach to cannabis cookery read our exclusive interview, Eat your damn greens! Chef Sebastain talks wildcrafting, cannabis cookery and his respect for the movement’s deep roots. Chef Sebastian generously shared this recipe with Heads Lifestyle. Now get in the kitchen and whip up something delicious! 

      

     

    Equipment + product source: MB2e MagicalButter Machine

     

    Photos: Chef Sebastian Carosi and Carla Asquith

    More about Chef Sebastian Carosi and his projects here

    Follow on Instagram at: @chef_sebatian_carosi